5 reasons you need to dive into Shogun right now

Shogun is a historical drama series on FX and Hulu. If you're still on the fence about watching it, here are five reasons to dive right in.

“SHOGUN” -- "Broken to the Fist" -- Episode 5 (Airs March 19) Pictured (L-R): Cosmo Jarvis as John Blackthorne, Anna Sawai as Toda Mariko. CR: Katie Yu/FX
“SHOGUN” -- "Broken to the Fist" -- Episode 5 (Airs March 19) Pictured (L-R): Cosmo Jarvis as John Blackthorne, Anna Sawai as Toda Mariko. CR: Katie Yu/FX /
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Don't miss Shogun on Hulu

There are a lot of historical dramas out there, and Shogun is one that is airing on FX and Hulu right now. Still on the fence about watching this one? We have some great reasons to try it out.

Shogun is based on the novel of the same name by James Clavell. It is not the first time that the novel has been adapted, but this series is much better than the first attempt.

The series follows John Blackthorn, an English Protestant who is on a Dutch ship that crashes into Japanese land. The Japanese have only had connections with the Portuguese up to this point, a Catholic group of people who do not view Protestants as the right religion at all. On top of that, Japan is in the middle of its own feud with the death of its leader.

Not sure if this is going to be a series for you? Here are my five top reasons for tuning into this series and supporting it.

It is respectful of Japanese culture

A lot of shows of the past would make fun of other cultures. They would use certain accents, costumes, or ways of walking as stereotypes, rather than paying homage and being respectful. As more and more people speak out about this, we’re seeing a shift in being respectful of culture and history. That’s certainly something Shogun does.

It doesn’t shy away from some of the atrocities of the people—it also shows the atrocities of the white people as well. This series brings the clothing of the time to life, and it is respectful of what was considered “right” in their culture. There’s a way to show the truth without mocking it, and that’s something the series has managed to do from the way the people speak to the way the women walk.